If Ultraviolet Blood Treatment (UBT) is close to being the universal cure for viral and Superbug infections, why isn’t it in general use?

Orthodox medicine drove UBT underground in the 1950s and has kept it there ever since. UBT, if generally available, would significantly reduce the revenue for hospitals, some specialists and drug companies. See the Rise and Fall of UBT Section.

Is UBT really that effective?

Yes, it has been. See the section on Infection Cures. Millions of successful UBT treatments attest to its efficacy. Several of the studies compare the outcome for patients treated with UBT against “controls” (patients not treated with UBT).

Is UBT really safe?

See the section on Safety of UBT. In over 75 years, and millions of successful UBT treatments, there have been no reports of significant adverse side-effects.

Can I get UBT done in the USA?

Yes, but there are only about 200 doctors using UBT in their offices and, in many states, they risk being raided by state medical societies trying to stamp out UBT.

Can I get UBT done in a hospital ICU to save my life when I am dying of an “untreatable” infection?

Probably not! Hospitals will not use a treatment, no matter how successful it will be, when it has not been approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) unless there is an ongoing trial of UBT under the auspices of an Institutional Review Board (IRB).

Why isn’t UBT FDA approved?

Because getting FDA approval is too expensive. See the Rise and Fall of UBT Section.

Why doesn’t the government’s National Institutes of Health (NIH), Center for Disease Control (CDC), or Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) pay to get UBT approved by the FDA?

Good question. BARDA has allocated up to $200 million to a British drug company to find a new antibiotic that will treat Superbugs. About 10% of that sum would pay for the FDA double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that would approve UBT for use by hospitals to treat Superbugs and other “untreatable” infections and save hundreds of thousands of lives every year in the USA and eliminate the suffering of many more people with non-fatal conditions such as ‘flu, shingles, bug bites, etc. Even if a new antibiotic is found that is effective without very nasty side-effects, there still won’t be a cure for viral infections.